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20121204
20121204
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
republicans pitch their plan to avoid the fiscal cliff and like the president's plan they don't expect to win over the opposition. a sfl senate fight. will republicans reject a personal plea from their former leader bob dole. he's making a rare visit to the senate floor to make his case. and now that we've had a whole month to digest that election day data, where you'll find those who voted for every presidential winner since 1956. that's in today's deep dive. i'm chuck todd feeling a little clogged up as you might hear. the fiscal cliff counteroffer has one thing in common. the differences between the new republican plan and what the white house proposed are stark when it comes to taxes. the gop calls for $800 million in new taxes. it's half of what the white house asked for. republicans to $67 billion. the gop plan changes how security benefits would be calculated. why he favors tax rates instead of eliminating deductions. not enough revenue. less revenue equals more cuts in education. republicans ruled that out saying the new revenue would not be achieved through higher tax rates which we
the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally preserve tax cuts for income over $250,000. they want to preserve the reduced capital gains rate and dividends rate which principally who ben pets, who else, millionaires and billionaires. now -- benefits, wh
to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republican house speaker john boehner dismisses it as, and i'm quoting, la la land. the republicans offered their proposal, that happened about 24 hours ago. the white house quickly labels it as nothing new. business as usual, right? so how do we move beyond this stalemate in washington? we heard from the president, just a short time ago. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin joins me now, jessica, the president spoke out, sat down in an interview with bloomberg tv, and in listening to the interview, did you hear any clues toward a possible compromise here? >> reporter: not new clues, brooke. the president laid down the marker that we heard from the white house consistently, which is they aren't moving until they hear the republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthiest. listen to what the president had to say. >> i think that, you know, we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it is going to require what i talked about during the campaign, which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses
that fiscal cliff house republicans are now offering up a plan of their own to avert that combination of spending cuts and tax hikes. it's set to welcome us all on january 1st if they don't have an agreement. i'm jenna lee. jon: some kind of welcome that would be. i'm jon scott. within hours of seeing the proposal the white house slammed the g.o.p. offer saying quote their plan provides nothing new and provides no details on what deductions they'll limb nature, loopholes they will close or which medicare savings they would achieve. house speaker john boehner inc insists his offer is the best one on the table calling it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. jenna: mike emanuel is with us. certainly a challenge to find this ideal plan. what is holding it up. >> reporter: the chairman of the senate budget committee wants a large come proceed hence i have deal in the range of $5 trillion and says a grand bargain can get done if everybody kaoels cool and doesn't overreact to every valley over the net. he this is a camp david-style summit might help things
the republican counteroffer, the proposal to avoid the so called fiscal cliff. it is a $2.2 trillion offer that does not raise the tax rate on the wealthiest americans and that has become the central issue of the negotiations. the white house says republicans still are not ready to get serious. susan mcginnis is in washington with the back and forth details. susan, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, terrell. gop leaders here on capitol hill sent their plan to the white house in this letter on monday, and now that both initial offers are out there, both sides say it's time to get serious. governors from six states are headed here to washington today to tell president obama their thoughts on the fiscal cliff. the bipartisan group says both sides need to work together to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in at the end of the year. >> no one's going to get what they want, but as a country to move forward, we've got to figure out who gives where, and if everything is going to be out on the table, how do we negotiate that? >> reporter: republicans have given a co
: let's go to our next caller in massachusetts. the democrats line. caller: looking at the fiscal cliff, we go back to 2001 with the lowering of the tax rates, meant to create jobs. but in the past 10 or 11 years, we have not had any job creation whatsoever. we keep going back and hearing over and over again that it's going to cost jobs. we do not have jobs to begin with. businesses are out to make money. if consumers do not have money to spend, then you can lower their taxes to 0%. they still cannot spend because they do not have any income. guest: i think that is a great point. it brings up one thing we have not mentioned yet. the payroll tax cut is about to expire. if that expires, every paycheck in the country is going to go down about $1,000 on january 1st. that would hurt consumption. it would hurt the customers of businesses. the president has proposed to extend that. i think that is reasonable. we will see a firm public and keep up their opposition or they give in. we have a sleeper here that cannot be ignored. if we do not extend that, every paycheck in the country is going to
-called fiscal cliff. president obama meets with bipartisan groups of governors about the problem today. the meeting a day after house speaker jonathan boehner laid a republican plan to solve the crisis on the table and calls for $800 billion in higher taxes revenue and does not increase taxes on wealthy americans. the white house is rejecting the offer, saying any deal must include an end to tax cuts for families making over $250,000. >>> and the senate has approved a new u.s. commander for the war in afghanistan. he's marine corporal general joseph doneford and replaces general john al llen, nominatedo head forces in europe. allen's nomination on hold because of his involvement in the sex scandal that brought down former cia director david petraeus. >>> in foreign news, new intelligence reports, indicate syria's government may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons against the rebels. in response though, the u.s. and its allies are considering military options. here's abc's martha raddatz. >> reporter: the latest intelligence is alarming. officials telling abc news the u.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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